Ted Larsen: Lined Out

Ted Larsen: Lined Out

Old Jail Art Center (map)

Since 2001 New Mexico artist Ted Larsen has utilized found scrap metal that he welds, stitches, reconfigures, combines or otherwise manipulates in his sculptures.  The carefully crafted sculptures retain their brilliantly painted surfaces, often showing the scars, rust, scuffs and scratches referencing the original object’s former function or life. Unlike a Frankenstein-like montage of pieces, Larsen’s creations are uniform and systematic with all parts functioning as a whole. The results are works that utilize and comment on the formal and theoretical concerns of Minimalism, Geometric Abstraction, and Constructivism.

 

For his Cell Series installation, Larsen will work with challenging and complex former jail cell spaces. His soluction is to utilize basic linear elements and “to deploy Lined Out in a manner that both disregards and is informed by these specific qualities within the architecture.”  

 

The OJAC’s Cell Series presents the work of living artists within the “challenging” upper galleries of the historic 1877 jail structure. Sustaining the passion of the OJAC founders in supporting and exhibiting contemporary artists, visitors encounter works by artists that attempt to interpret and translate the world we universally experience with often surprising and enlightening results.

 

 

[Image:  TED LARSEN, Lined Out (detail), 2017, metal, dimensions vary. Courtesy of the artist and Conduit Gallery, Dallas, TX.]

 


The Cell Series is made possible with the generous support of Susie and Joe Clack, Amy and Patrick Kelly, McGinnis Family Fund of Communities Foundation of Texas, Kathy Webster in memory of Charles H. Webster.

Intimate View: The Ramsey Collection

Intimate View: The Ramsey Collection

Old Jail Art Center (map)

An intimate view of works on paper from Ray and Frances Ramsey’s private collection of Old Master and American and European Modernist works. The Ramsey’s extensive collection has been amassed over more than forty years and is now housed in a two-story limestone building in Hamilton, Texas.

 

Original drawings and prints from Eugene Delacroix and Francisco Goya to Pablo Picasso and Wassily Kandinsky will be on view from this surprising collection.

 

 

This exhibit is made possible with the generous support of John & Ginger Dudley, Ann & Hank Paup, Betsy & Chuck Senter

 

[Image:  View of the Ramsey Collection, Hamilton, Texas.] 


This exhibit is made possible with the generous support of John & Ginger Dudley, Ann & Hank Paup, Betsy & Chuck Senter. 

What Lies Beneath: Collage, Montage, Assemblage

What Lies Beneath: Collage, Montage, Assemblage

Old Jail Art Center (map)

The process of collage—of adhering paper or objects to another surface—can be traced back centuries. In Modern art, the idea of incorporating existing, common materials had its humble beginnings with Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso. In 1912, Braque bought a roll of factory printed oilcloth (early version of contact paper) with a woodgrain pattern at a hardware store. He then glued it to his charcoal drawing of a guitar to simulate its wood texture rather than drawing the woodgrain. That same year, Picasso used the same material with a chair-caning pattern, along with an actual rope as an oval framing device, in Still-Life with Chair Caning to create one of his first documented collage/assemblage works on canvas.

 

Though the basic techniques have remained somewhat unchanged, source materials and media have varied and expanded over the last century. Artists have and currently use collage, montage, and assemblage broadly with diverse styles. From manipulating pictorial space to exploring various concepts, the works can be humorous, political, satirical, socially critical, or simply visually stunning.

 

What Lies Beneath presents the work of nine contemporary artists who utilize the mediums of collage, montage (photographs or film), and assemblage (found objects). Mass-produced print imagery and utilitarian objects—fueled by voracious consumerism—have created an endless supply of source materials for these artists in their productions of collages, montages, and assemblages. Though diverse in appearance, all of the works in this exhibition share a commonality of providing layered meanings, consciously or sub-consciously, embedded by the artists. The full potential of each work is revealed by the viewers’ efforts to discover “what lies beneath.”

 

What Lies Beneath features the works of Andy Coolquitt, Matthew Cusick, John Fraser, Lily Hanson, Luke Harnden, Dana Harper, Lance Letscher, Shaun O’Dell, and Dario Robleto.

 

 

 

[Image:  MATTHEW CUSICK, Olds ’84, 2014, inlaid maps on wood panel, 30 x 45 in. Courtesy of the artist and Holly Johnson Gallery, Dallas, TX.]


This exhibit is made possible with the generous support of Pryor Blackwell, Bluff Creek Ranch, Karron and Dan Crenwelge, Doug and Nita Drawe.

SHOWTIME: Photographs of Music Legends by Watt Casey Jr.

SHOWTIME: Photographs of Music Legends by Watt Casey Jr.

n 1970, while a roadie for a music touring company, Watt Casey Jr began photographing the famous and not yet famous musicians of American music genres of rock-and-roll, blues, country, and folk. Throughout his life he has photographed now iconic artists on and off stage including: Stevie Ray Vaughan, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Neil Young, Elvis Costello, Joni Mitchell, Jerry Garcia, Fleetwood Mac, Muddy Waters, BB King, Steve Miller, Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, and many others. This exhibit features those captured by Casey’s lens over the last five decades.


Showtime is sponsored in part by Bob Brittingham and Louann George, John R. Caldwell, Holly and Jason Cauble, Susie and Joe Clack, Chris and Leanna Frasier, Susie and Clark Gregg, The Helen K. Groves Fund, Joe Hargrove, Jeff and Susan Jones, Pati and Bill Meadows – TLR Ranch, Nesa Smith Morelock, Open Nine Music, Pati and K.C. Jones, Winifred Y. Waller, Bill Wright, Betsy and Chuck Senter, and Charles and Kate Ferguson. 

 

Cell Series: Joel Sampson

Cell Series: Joel Sampson

Joel Sampson combines technology, visual art, music, and design to create works of art that remind viewers they are witness to a one-man band...minus the man. Fun, whimsical, annoying, clever, loud, and ingenious are words that describe the finished works. Sampson hand builds and programs his “electro-mechanical sound art” that combines solenoids, LED lights, wires, found objects, and microcomputers. Stimulating multiple senses, these fascinating objects leave a lasting impression on viewers.


The 2017 Cell Series is sponsored in part by Susie and Joe Clack, Amy and Patrick Kelly, McGinnis Family Fund of Communities Foundation of Texas, and Kathy Webster in Memory of Charles H. Webster. 

JOEL SAMPSON, Pipe, 2012-201, mixed media. Courtesy of the artist.